27 June 2016

Alumni Work - Nancy Hoogerwerf

Nancy Hoogerwerf is a recent Herron School of Art & Design graduate with a minor in book arts. On display now in the library is the culmination of six students work from this course of study. Which has allowed each of them to funnel their creative work through the medium of the artist book which includes letterpress, other printmaking media and papermaking. Each student has been able to use the artist book in ways distinct to their interest and parallel to their major focus of work at Herron or IUPUI.

"Artist books give me the opportunity to combine Medieval and contemporary aesthetics. Making books also expands my interest in building technical vocabulary. My involvement with the Medieval time period has shown me that when I do the work well my audience is drawn in and becomes intimately engaged with my work. Once people are engaged witht eh Medieval binding techniques, it gives me a strong platform for my broader narative." ~Nancy Hoogerwerf




24 June 2016

Broadsides

Broadsides make up a large part of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here collection. Combining text and image onto paper the broadsides are all powerful works that can communicate a lot at a glance.

 
"Reality" printed by Tina Brown. Text by Aram Saroyan.

"In Memory" printed by Inge Bruggeman. Text by Alan Loney.



"TV Terror" printed by Tara Bryan. Text by Huda Al-Marashi.

"This is No Symbol" printed by Kathleen Burch. Text from Zara Houshmand.



"Ode to Mutanabbi" printed by Angie Butler and Lilla Duignan. Text by al-Mutanabbi.




"Grandchildren of Sinbad" printed by Katherine Case and Annie Stenzel. Text byAbdul-Razzaq al-Rubai.

Alumni Work - Megan Coffel

For the summer term Herron Art Library is showing works made by graduated students who earned a minor in book arts. Each graduate has their own cabinet for display in the library. This work was made by the artist Megan Coffel who states:

"Story of a Tree is a star-book/carousel binding about a father and his son. Through the layers of the story, you follow a tree in its journey of death and rebirth. Likewise, you follow the death and rebirth of the family's responsibilities to the forest. The book was made from a series of laser-engraved woodcuts that were then printed on an Sp15 Vendercook letterpress onto tan paper and sewn into the carousel binding. On the outside layer of the book is a piece of leather, possibly pigskin suede, which has been laser-engraved and cut to become a frame for each page. The cicadas on the outside are made with wings made of handmade Abaca paper, which are then wrapped to a hand-cut copper cicada body with polyester string, and finally sewn onto the book with the same string."




 








17 June 2016

Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here - Manuscripts Don't Burn by Dan Wood


Manuscripts Don't Burn is an artist book created by Dan Wood and is a part of our Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here collection that serves as a memorial for the March 5, 2007 bombing of the street of booksellers. The book is in a scroll format and includes text from an article about the bombing written by Anthony Shadid. The line itself is spoken by the devil to an author who burned his own writing only to have it returned unharmed in the book The Master and Margarita written by Mikhail Bulgakov. Touching on the idea that written words and thoughts cannot be truly destroyed this piece evokes the futility of anyone who tries to eradicate books from the world.


 


The Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here collection is a series of artist books, broad sides, and prints made by a variety of artists from around the world who were asked to respond to the March 5, 2007 car bombing of Al-Mutanabbi street. A street of booksellers and often considered the heart of Baghdad for intellectuals and poets. The collection is available for browsing online and can be seen by request. It is asked that those interested in seeing the collection wash their hands before interacting with the works, and let library staff know in advance. 
(317) 278-9400
herron@iupui.edu


27 March 2014

Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Poetry Reading and reception at Herron Art Library, March 5th, 2014



Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here at Herron Art Library, IUPUI


A Poetry Reading and reception took place at Herron Art Library, Artist Book Alcove
Herron School of Art and Design on Wednesday, March 5th, 2014. The event, hosted in collaboration with theAl-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Coalition marked the bombing of the historic literary and cultural center of Baghdad, al-Mutanabbi Street, that stood as the major literary and cultural center of Baghdad for hundreds of years. On March 5th, 2007, a suicide bomber tragically destroyed this cultural center where scholars, artists, poets, and writers had gathered for centuries. In response to this destructive act a community of international artists and writers rallied to produce a collection of letterpress-printed broadsides (poster-like works on paper), artists’ books (unique works of art in book form), and an anthology of writing, all focused on expressing solidarity with Iraqi booksellers, writers and readers. The coalition of contributing artists calls itself Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here. Now, 7 years later, the Coalition is as strong as ever as it touches poets, artists, writers, and scholars worldwide. 
 
The event at the Herron Art Library was an intimate and movingly powerful one. After a brief introduction and welcome, the participants, who were drawn from the student, faculty, and staff of IUPUI as well as from the local community, introduced either their own original work or the work they were reading, with a display of some of the broadsides and artists’ books from the Coalition’s collection providing an appropriate and visually eloquent backcloth to the event. Their works expressed the poignancy and tragedy of acts of violence and destruction that have taken place in Baghdad, as well as the sense of rising hope and optimism that responses such as the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Coalition foster.
 
The readings
 
Alfan Abdulahad, Center for Interfaith Cooperation, spoke on Al-Mutanabbi, the 10th century classical Arabic poet for whom the street was named. Alfan discussed the poet’s life, his poetry, and her own reflections in both Arabic and English. Alfan moved to the United States from Iraq via Syria.
Basim Najeeb shared his reflections and experiences on al-Mutanabbi Street, the shops and street life there, and then read the poem, Good-bye My Hometown/Mahmood Sami Al-Baroodi in Arabic and English.
Karen Kovacik, Indiana’s Poet Laureate, 2011-2013; IUPUI School of Liberal Arts, Director of Creative Writing, Adjunct Professor of Women’s Studies, read a poem from her anthology which talked about the Buddha statues destroyed in Afghanistan.
Becky Lukovic, former IUPUI student, read her poem about Syria, Kerry Set the Table
Terry, Kirts, Senior Lecturer in English, Director of Rufus and Lois Reiberg Reading Series, read from the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Anthology
Zulaiha Razak, IUPUI student/Diversity Scholar, read the poem from the anthology, Black and Red by  Fred Norman
Leena Dobouni, IUPUI student/Diversity Scholar, read the poem, Baghdad  by Nizar al Kabbani in Arabic and English
Barbara Hussein, Coalition artist, presented her artist book describing its inspiration, content, and process.
Nina Ardery, Coalition artist, read a passage offered by Beau Beausoleil, Founder of the Coalition
 
The response to this event indicated a clear desire to make it an annual one. The occasion provided a touching opportunity for participants to share their experiences and reflections through the vehicle of poetry, while commemorating the tragic event that took place in Baghdad on March 5th, 2007.

19 February 2014

Call for Poets, Readers, and Participants

Call for Poets, Readers, and Participants

               
Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here at IUPUI

Poetry Reading and Reception
Wednesday, March 5th, 2014
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Herron Art Library, Artist Book Alcove
Herron School of Art and Design
735 W. New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202


IUPUI University Library and the Herron Art Library, in collaboration with the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Coalition, invite you to share in an afternoon of poetry on March 5th, 2014 from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., marking the bombing of the historic literary and cultural center of Baghdad, al-Mutanabbi Street.  This renowned street, named for the famous 10th century classical Arab poet, Al-Mutanabbi, had stood as the major literary and cultural center of Baghdad for hundreds of years.  

On March 5th, 2007, a suicide bomber tragically destroyed this cultural center where scholars, artists, poets, and writers had gathered for centuries.  In response to this destructive act, Beau Beausoleil, a poet and bookseller from California, was moved to act in solidarity with the people of Iraq against such acts.  He rallied a community of international artists and writers to produce a collection of letterpress-printed broadsides (poster-like works on paper), artists’ books (unique works of art in book form), and an anthology of writing, all focused on expressing solidarity with Iraqi booksellers, writers and readers. The coalition of contributing artists calls itself Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here. Now, 7 years later, the Coalition is as strong as ever as it touches poets, artists, writers, and scholars worldwide. 

Please join us March 5th, 2014, at the Herron Art Library as we mark the anniversary of the bombing of al-Mutanabbi Street through poetry, standing with all people across the globe who want free speech and continue to struggle for the free exchange of ideas through the sharing of academic, literary and visual creativity.

We invite poets, readers, and participants to join us during our Indianapolis, IN event to read poetry from the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Anthology or from your own individual work in an effort to support the free exchange of ideas and to protest against the destruction of diverse shared cultures. 

If you would like to read during our event or would like more information please contact Sonja Staum at sstaumku@iupui.edu. *

14 November 2012

Construction is finished!

We've expanded our artists' books area with more display cabinets and group study tables, thanks to the generous support of Mark and Carmen Holeman. Come by and take a look!



29 August 2012

What's behind the plastic?

You may have noticed that the back of the library is now sporting a giant wall of plastic. We're undergoing a transformation that will be unveiled in a few weeks. What was once a slide library will soon be additional display cases and storage for the artists' books collection, as well as a digitally-equipped instruction space. We can't wait to see it finished!

09 August 2012

Updated Art Research Guide!

Have you had a chance to check out our Art Research Guide? The guide includes resources for finding art-related materials online. You can find links to the library's article and image databases, as well as lists of art blogs, career websites, and our favorite books.

There are also handy tutorials on how to use some of the library's online resources, like this ARTstor tutorial.



Stop in or call us (317 278 9484) if you would like more information on using any of these resources.

31 May 2012

Weekly Perusables: Joy in People



New to the library is Jeremy Deller’s exhibition catalog Joy in People, which covers his artistic debut in 1993 (a secret exhibition in his parents’ house while they were away on vacation), up to 2012. Deller is a contemporary British artist, who makes unconventional work that doesn’t fit in with the mainstream gallery scene. He didn’t go to art school, yet won the Turner Prize in 2004. You can read reviews of the Joy in People exhibit here: Telegraph, Domus, Abitare, and find the book on our New Books shelf for the next month. Cheerio!

NX 180 .A77 D45 2012 stacks

image source: D.A.P.

(blog entry by Jessica Sowls)